MA News The Headlines

“Beyond Naked City: Jews and Urban Photography” weekend at YBC

AMHERST – Professor Deborah Dash Moore of the University of Michigan will lead “Beyond Naked City: Jews and Urban Photography,” a weekend program at the Yiddish Book Center Friday Oct. 26 through Sunday, Oct. 28. The weekend will include lectures, film screenings, tours of the center, kosher meals, and conversation.

The Jewish photographer, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), gave the title Naked City to a photo book that he published in 1945, which became first a bestseller and then a murder mystery movie. Though Weegee hit the jackpot with Naked City, he was not alone in snapping pictures of New York. This course looks at a cluster of New York Jewish photographers who pictured the city, their home, in the middle decades of the 20th century.

Deborah Dash Moore is Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. An historian of American Jews, she has published an acclaimed trilogy examining the years from 1920 to 1960, including the experience of Jewish soldiers in World War II. She is also known as an historian of New York City. In 2001 she published with Howard Rock, Cityscapes: A History of New York in Images and in 2012 she served as general editor for the award-winning three volume City of Promises: A History of Jews in New York City. Her most recent book, Jewish New York: The Remarkable Story of a City and a People, synthesizes those three volumes. From 2005-2015 she served as Director of the University of Michigan’s Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies. Currently she is Editor-in-Chief of the ten-volume Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization published by Yale University Press.

For a full weekend schedule, go to www.yiddishbookcenter.org. For more information, call Margaret Frothingham at (413) 256-4900, ext. 152. $350 for Yiddish Book Center members; $425 for non-members.  Registration closes Oct. 15.

SHARE
RELATED POSTS
SeniorNet Workshop and Genealogy Class
‘Laughter heals’ is message of unlikely Jewish-Muslim comedy act

Comments are closed.